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20130117
20130125
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
of jockbs and what's happening in north africa and foreign policy, at least not yet. where should they make a move? >> if the president is true to his word, he needs to do something about the economy, about job creation. there are more unemployed or underemployed people in this country today than there were when the president first took office. we've seen a 33% increase in spending on welfare programs. the african-american unemployment rate in this country is double the national average. and nothing that the president is talking about right now seems to be geared toward putting those people back to work. >> i want to put some numbers on the screen right now, it's fox news polling that's new and how the people feel about the president now compared with four years ago. 47% disapprove, compared with 16% four years ago and look at the flip-flop in terms of those who approve there on the screen, and 47-65%, the jobs that you're talking about, maybe point a little to that, but there are other things that you've written about in a column. >> absolutely. look, you have a middle class whose incomes
law. he has been co opted but part of that was because the foreign policy was complicity. they welcomed the muslim brotherhood and the white house doing that. we haven't been serious about getting behind executive forces. we were serious about getting behind anti communist parties in the cold war in europe. recreating that would be a much better way to go in my opinion. >> as you look at that part of the world it is volatile. we know terrorists are there. we know right next door the french are fighting in mali to drive out terrorists there. they have already asked for our help. we have a situation in turkey where we put patriot missiles on the ground to help them out they have a civil war next door playing out inside syria. going forward, i mean it sounds like this needs to be a part of the world where we engage but how do we engage without putting our people in harm's way? >> we should be smart about doing it. we have a relatively new u.s. africa command. that's the over riding story of the past couple of months. the nexus of the islamists insurgency in many ways was cen
of cool detachment has been his foreign policy hallm k hallmark. they are a catalyst present but not deeply involved. just to start you out on the huge threat of an iranian nuclear weapon, how does that facr into the second term? >> i think it's possible that this year there may be an action by israel against iran. it looked likely last year. i thought it was going to happen. and then it looked less likely. and people i'm speaking to think it is once again a possibility. that changes the entire dynamic. and this administration talks about wanting to shift to asia. sure, that sounds greatest. but i think it will be very difficult to do. especially in that happens. if the israelis decide after their elections that they are moving a little bit more to the right, if the iranian elections coming up bring that country even further to the right, it seems like some sort of clash is coming. that's just on the israel-iran. if you look -- broaden out a little bit, then you have syria, which is in state collapse, and is probably going to be in some sort of state of anarchy over the next
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
administration's foreign policy and i urge his sped deacon firm mags. >> before leaving, just like her first day on the job four years ago -- >> i am absolutely honored and thrilled beyond words to be here with you. >> clinton is likely to say good-bye to the diplomat she's led and deliver a major speech on international policy. but her last days as america's high-flying top diplomat have been overshadowed by nearly a month of illness, the fallout over the deadly attack in benghazi. >> i think it's inexcusable that you did not know about this and that you did not read these cables. >> and her impassioned defense. >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened. >> i don't think it will be part of her legacy. >> beyond benghazi, former secretary of state madeleine albright says clinton did something big for america's foreign policy. >> i think she will be valued greatly for finding other parts than just military power for america the way that we use our influence. >> others, while praising clinton personally, charge the administration she's part of, failed
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)